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Air conditioning Duct cleaning  
Duct Cleaning generally refers to the cleaning of various cooling system components of forced air systems, including the supply and return air ducts and registers, grilles and diffusers, exchangers.

If not properly installed, maintained, and operated, these components may become contaminated with particles of dust, pollen or other debris. If moisture is present, the potential for microbiological growth (e.g., mold) is increased and spores from such growth may be released into the buildings living space. Some of these contaminants may cause allergic reactions or other symptoms in people if they are exposed to them.

Failure to clean a component of a contaminated system can result in re-contamination of the entire system, thus negating any potential benefits. NADCA recommends source removal method of duct cleaning. Source removal methods remove the dust, which is a food source for microbial contamination.
 
Kitchen Exhaust system duct Cleaning

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Air Handling Unit Coil cleaning

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Ducting work/ Modification work

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Indoor Air Quality Testing
"All of us face a variety of risks to our health as we go about our day-to-day lives. Driving in cars, flying in planes, engaging in recreational activities, and being exposed to environmental pollutants all pose varying degrees of risk. Some risks are simply unavoidable. Some we choose to accept because to do otherwise would restrict our ability to lead our lives the way we want. And some are risks we might decide to avoid if we had the opportunity to make informed choices. Indoor air pollution is one risk that you can do something about."

Indoor air quality is a general term describing the condition of air inside buildings. Such air quality is influenced by the temperature and humidity of the air, and the level of carbon dioxide that is produced by occupants. Air quality may be influenced adversely by the presence of toxic air contaminants (particles, gases, vapors, and fumes) in concentrations sufficient to cause health problems, and by agents that have specific odours that can be offensive or irritating. The most common indoor contaminants are the volatile organic compounds (VOC's) outgassed from interior furnishings. Microbiological contaminants (namely bacteria, mould, mildew and fungi) run a close second. While air quality is often the major concern for a comfortable indoor environment, that environment may also be influenced adversely by heating or cooling problems, as well as issues of noise, lighting, and other factors.
 
Food and Water testing

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